Issue 15 of Polar Borealis Available for Download

Polar Borealis Issue 15The latest issue of Polar Borealis, edited by SF Canada member R. Graeme Cameron, was published this past June.

Discover poetry from SF Canada members Melanie Marttila and Lisa Timpf, along with fiction from Robert Runté.

Graeme has been nominated for a 2020 Aurora Award for both Polar Borealis and Amazing Stories.

Polar Borealis is currently closed to poetry and fiction submissions, but is open for cover art. Check the website for an announcement in February 2021 regarding the next submissions window.

Download Issue 15 for free. Visit polarborealis.ca to view back issues and find more information about this paying market.

“Billy Ray’s Small Appliance Rehabilitation” by Geoffrey W. Cole

SF Canada member Geoffrey W. Cole’s novelette “Billy Ray’s Small Appliance Rehabilitation” was recently published in the environmental justice magazine, Reckoning 4. Guest-edited by Danika Dinsmore and (the Hugo, Nebula and Locus Award nominated!) Arkady Martine, this issue focuses on the challenges of urban environments.

“A sobering burst of dynamic stories, poems, and essays that struggle with our overheating world. Arkady Martine and Danika Dinsmore have assembled a powerful collection for our unique time.” —Tobias Buckell, co-author (with Paolo Bacigalupi) of The Tangled Lands

Geoffrey W. Cole is an award-winning author, an engineer, a father of three, and a loving husband. Previously, he was a Segway tour leader in Rome, a Lego robotics instructor, a grizzly-bear handler, and a rock-n-roll singer. He enjoys back-country skiing, surfing, canoeing, cycling, roleplaying games, board games, fencing, running, and staring at trees. Geoff has degrees in biology, engineering, and an MFA in creative writing. He lives in Toronto, Canada. Geoff is a member of SF Canada and SFWA. Visit Geoff at www.geoffreywcole.com.

Read Geoff’s story here and subscribe to Reckoning today.

A Diary in the Age of Water by Nina Munteanu


SF Canada member Nina Munteanu‘s latest publication is A Diary in the Age of Water. The novel, published by Inanna Publications, follows the climate-induced journey of Earth and humanity through four generations of women, each with a unique relationship to water. It explores identity and our concept of what is “normal”—as a nation and an individual—in a world that is rapidly and incomprehensibly changing.

Launched in Toronto in June as an online event, Nina’s novel is already attracting attention. Watch a recording of the launch here.

“Evoking Ursula LeGuin’s unflinching humane and moral authority, Nina Munteanu takes us into the lives of four generations of women and their battles against a global giant that controls and manipulates Earth’s water. In a diary that entwines acute scientific observation with poignant personal reflection, Lynna’s story unfolds incrementally, like climate change itself. Particularly harrowing are the neighbourhood water betrayals, along with Lynna’s deliberately dehydrated appearance meant to deflect attention from her own clandestine water collection. Her estrangement from her beloved daughter, her “dark cascade” who embarks upon a deadly path of her own, is heartwrenching. Munteanu elegantly transports us between Lynna’s exuberant youth and her tormented present, between microcosm and macrocosm, linking her story and struggles-and those of her mother, daughter, and granddaughter-to the life force manifest in water itself. In language both gritty and hauntingly poetic, Munteanu delivers an uncompromising warning of our future.”
—Lynn Hutchinson Lee, multimedia artist, author, and playwright

Nina Munteanu is a Canadian ecologist and novelist. Her novels include: Collision with Paradise; The Cypol; Angel of Chaos; Darwin’s Paradox; The Splintered Universe Trilogy; and The Last Summoner. In addition to eight novels, she has authored award-winning short stories, articles and non-fiction books, which were reprinted and translated into several languages throughout the world. Her short work has appeared in Beautiful BC Magazine, Cli-Fi: Canadian Tales of Climate Change, Chiaroscuro, Hadrosaur Tales, Pacific Yachting, Strange Horizons, Nowa Fantastyka, among others. Recognition for her work includes the Midwest Book Review Reader’s Choice Award, finalist for Foreword Magazine’s Book of the Year Award, the SLF Fountain Award, and The Delta Optimist Reviewers Choice Award. Nina’s latest non-fiction book, Water Is…—a scientific study and personal journey as limnologist, mother, teacher, and environmentalist—was picked by Margaret Atwood in the NY Times. as her #1 choice in the 2016 “The Year in Reading.” She lives in Toronto. www.ninamunteanu.ca

Order A Diary in the Age of Water today!

Climate fiction by Holly Schofield

Climate change (and how it relates to the pandemic) is on everyone’s mind these days, and trends in speculative fiction have quickly reflected that. Climate fiction, also called Cli-Fi, is a subgenre of Eco-Fiction in that it involves the direct or indirect effects of climate change in an ecologically focused story.

SF Canada member Holly Schofield’s short stories about climate change usually take the optimistic approach. Her first cli-fi story was published way back in 2013 in Perihelion. In “Hurry Up and Wait”, an apocalypse survivor is initially happy that he finally is being left alone by society and, well, you can guess how long that lasts. You can find it reprinted in Into the Ruins.

Holly’s stories take place in various locations. “The Knells of Agassiz” (published in the Water anthology heads up north to help preserve Canada’s glaciers. “One Bad Apple” (SciFutures’ City of the Future anthology) journeys to an inner city food forest. “Home on the Free Range” (Analog) examines a complex ecosystem on an exoplanet from the point of view of a farm worker. In the fourth volume of the middle grade Young Explorer’s Adventure Guide, a young girl sneaks out of her habitat home to take an adventurous walk on an alien world because “Fluffy Pets are Best”.

Science always plays a role. “The Weight of the World” (Cli-Fi: Canadian Tales of Climate Change) and the forthcoming “Handful of Empty” (The Way of the Laser anthology) are both about food security under very different circumstances. “Wicked Problem”, (Utopia SF Magazine) has a scientist and her daughter dealing with an actively dangerous climate-changed environment. In “Bear #178” (Winner of Communitech’s True North contest), a tech-enhanced grizzly bear solves the problem of her shrinking habitat in a disastrous way.

Both “The Call of the Wold” (Solarpunk Summers) and “Halps’ Promise” (just released in Solarpunk Winters) take a lighter turn regarding the workings of two very different intentional communities.

A Distant Honk” (The Unlikely Coulrophobia Remix anthology) takes a humorous look at how feral clowns might adapt to climate change and how we might adapt along with them. “Stewardship” (Unsung Stories) is in a similar vein, a cautionary tale about environmental protection gone wrong.

Some of Holly’s stories are quite serious. “Five Ways to Talk about Twisted Oak Moss” in the Rising Tides literary anthology, examines our past and future environment, using moss colonies as a metaphor for larger habitats.

Holly Schofield travels through time at the rate of one second per second, oscillating between the alternate realities of city and country life. Her short stories have appeared in Analog, Lightspeed, Escape Pod, and many other publications throughout the world. Find her at hollyschofield.wordpress.com

Rebel by Krista D. Ball now out!

SF member Krista D. Ball has just released the third book in her Collaborator space opera series, Rebel, following Traitor and Fugitive.

Trust is the rarest of commodities.

From the moment she stepped onboard Liberty’s Pleasure, Rebecca St. Martin knew something was off. Before she could sound the alarm, she was kidnapped and pulled into a conspiracy that made her question every single relationship she’d made.

Even as Rebecca questioned, she looked around at her co-captives and decided it didn’t matter. She wouldn’t let anyone harm these people for one minute longer than necessary. They had no hero coming to rescue them. Just her.

Rebecca will have to put aside a lifetime of fear and be the hero these people need. Anyone wanting to hurt them would have to go through her first.

Krista D. Ball is a Canadian science fiction and fantasy author. She was born and raised in Newfoundland, Canada where she learned how to use a chainsaw, chop wood, and make raspberry jam. After obtaining a B.A. in British History from Mount Allison University, Krista moved to Edmonton, Alberta where she currently lives.

Like any good writer, Krista has had an eclectic array of jobs throughout her life, including strawberry picker, pub bathroom cleaner, oil spill cleaner upper, and soup kitchen coordinator. These days, Krista can be found causing trouble on Reddit when she’s not writing in her very messy, cat-filled office.

Find her at kristadball.com and be sure to get Rebel today from these ebook stores.

Polar Borealis new issue!

Issue #13 of Polar Borealis, edited by SF Canada member Richard Graeme Cameron, is now out. This Canadian online science fiction magazine enters its fourth year with a bang!

Read fiction and poetry by SF Canada members Lisa Timpf, Melissa Yuan-Innes, Geoffrey Hart, and Jean-Louis Trudel, along with many other fine writers.

Submissions are open until the end of February — new unpublished Canadian writers are especially encouraged to submit. Authors are paid.

Download this and past issues as a .pdf for free at Polar Borealis and show your support via the GoFundMe.

(cover art by Lily Blaze)